ONE Archives Foundation Names Tony Valenzuela as New Executive Director

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Tony Valenzuela - Photo by P James Melikyan

ONE Archives Foundation announced his week that longtime LGBTQ+ activist and nonprofit leader Tony Valenzuela (he/him) has been named as its new Executive Director. Valenzuela is the first Latinx person to lead ONE Archives Foundation, the longest continuously operating LGBTQ+ organization in the United States. ONE Archives Foundation will mark its 70th anniversary in November 2022. Valenzuela succeeds Jennifer C. Gregg, who had been Executive Director since 2016.

“Tony is admired and loved by the LGBTQ+ nonprofit community,” said Chiedu Egbuniwe, Board Chair of ONE Archives Foundation. “With unparalleled leadership experience, strong relationships, and boundless enthusiasm, Tony is the ideal leader for the organization. We are excited to work with him in our mission to keep queer history visible and to advance our vision of a safe future for all LGBTQ+ people.”

Valenzuela is the former Executive Director of the Los Angeles-based nonprofit the Foundation for The AIDS Monument (FAM), which is dedicated to installing a world-class monument in West Hollywood Park to memorialize lost loved ones and educating the public about the historical achievements of HIV/AIDS activist communities. Prior to FAM, he served as the Executive Director of Lambda Literary, the nation’s premier queer literary arts nonprofit, leading the organization for nearly a decade of sustained growth. While at Lambda Literary, Valenzuela founded the LGBTQ+ Writers in Schools program, the first ever queer educational initiative in the K-12 New York City public schools system.

“I’m thrilled to step into the role of Executive Director at ONE Archives Foundation as this storied organization prepares to celebrate its 70th anniversary,” said Tony Valenzuela. “Although our work for social justice is never done, understanding our LGBTQ+ history provides us with inspiration and a roadmap to combat the prejudice and discrimination we continue to face today.”

Valenzuela succeeds long-time Executive Director Jennifer C. Gregg (she/her). In addition to her Los Angeles-based consulting practice, Gregg will join Mida Associates as a Senior Advisor for Grants and Organizational Capacity. Mida Associates is a DC-based consulting firm that supports nonprofit and advocacy organizations.

Valenzuela has been a part of the LGBTQ+ movement since becoming President of his campus queer organization at UC San Diego in 1990. He spent the early part of his career in management roles at the LGBT Center and LGBT VOICES (Voters Organized in Coalition for the Election), both in San Diego, and the Gay and Lesbian Adolescent Social Services in Los Angeles.

For his work as a leading activist and thought leader in HIV/AIDS communities since the 1990s, Tony was named one of the country’s most influential LGBTQ+ leaders in Out Magazine’s annual OUT100 list.

Valenzuela has spent his life immersed in arts communities. He received his undergraduate degree in Literature and Creative Writing from UC San Diego and an MFA in Creative Writing from the California Institute of the Arts. He has published short stories, articles, and essays, and has written and produced a one-man show that toured across the United States.

To learn more on One Archives, visit: onearchives.org. Connect with ONE on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram @onearchives.

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Tom Smart
Tom Smart
17 days ago

Congratulations! Perhaps you can make your archives more accessible to the people of the world on the net and in person. I remember seeing a ton of items at a Pride Celebration a long time ago and it was amazing. Would love to see it around town at events, galleries and other spaces. Only having available to research archivists and near USC would be a shame.