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    HomeNewsLA County's Potential Ban of Astro Turf Could Impact Plans for William...

    LA County’s Potential Ban of Astro Turf Could Impact Plans for William Hart Park

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    A Los Angeles City Council committee’s recent approval of a motion to potentially ban synthetic grass citywide due to environmental and health concerns could impact improvements planned for William Hart Dog Park in West Hollywood.

    The council’s Energy and Environment Committee approved the motion on Friday, allowing council members to further study the effects of polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) and other “forever chemicals” found in synthetic grass, which is mainly used in recreational fields, on school and city property, such as city parks.

    William S. Hart Park, is owned by the City of Los Angeles but managed by the City of West Hollywood. Part of planned improvements for the park includes replacing the wood chips at the dog park with artificial turf, a move opposed by various community members.

    A breakdown of improvements at William S. Hart Park include site access and disability upgrades, reconfiguration and surface material replacement of the off-leash dog area, and associated enhancements identified during a community outreach process. The City Council appointed Mayor John Erickson and Vice Mayor Chelsea Byers to the City Council Ad-Hoc Hart Park Subcommittee to evaluate other potential enhancements. The City Council also authorized funding for design and engineering services.

    In 2023, California passed legislation allowing local agencies to ban synthetic grass on residential properties, reversing a 2015 state law that had approved artificial grass to conserve water. In April 2024, the Biden Administration, through the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), classified PFAS and other “forever chemicals” as hazardous substances harmful to human health. The EPA determined that exposure to PFAS can cause reproductive issues, developmental delays, and increase the risk of certain cancers.

    Exposure to these chemicals can occur through inhalation, ingestion, skin contact, and mucous membranes, including from microplastic dust released by artificial turf fields.

    The potential ban on artificial turf in Los Angeles County is bound to come before the West Hollywood City Council for discussion.

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    Paulo Murillo
    Paulo Murillohttps://wehotimes.com
    Paulo Murillo is Editor in Chief and Publisher of WEHO TIMES. He brings over 20 years of experience as a columnist, reporter, and photo journalist. Murillo began his professional writing career as the author of “Love Ya, Mean It,” an irreverent and sometimes controversial West Hollywood lifestyle column for FAB! newspaper. His work has appeared in numerous print and online publications, which include the “Hot Topic” column in Frontiers magazine, where he covered breaking news and local events in West Hollywood. He can be reached at [email protected]

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    TomSmart
    TomSmart
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    15 days ago

    The “dirt/dust” from woodships is the result from the city not always changing out the chips when needed. The chips eventually disintegrate down to the dirt underneath and the dogs running stirs up dust. As for a separate area for small dogs, it’s most definitely needed but there’s no need to reduce the current fenced area to achieve this. Only people with larger dogs would make the silly statement that it’s not needed. We’ve seen plenty on smaller dogs getting hurt over the years. We are hoping the city takes the time t really speak with those of us who… Read more »

    Rod S
    Rod S
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    17 days ago

    my first question is why does the city of Los Angeles own a park in the city of West Hollywood? is this the only such property or are there others? As for the artificial turf, I don’t know that much about it, but I do know that it sure does make the West Hollywood dog parks very clean. Wood chips look good, but are very dirty. Maybe using small pebbles would be better. They are porous and the dogs won’t get dirty. My dog is less than 10 pounds so having big dogs in one park and small dogs in… Read more »

    Shane
    Shane
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    Reply to  Rod S
    16 days ago

    The park contains a structure which was the home of William S Hart. Upon his death he gave the property to the City of Los Angeles which happened before West Hollywood became a city. Little more history on it https://scvhistory.com/scvhistory/al2276.htm

    Bob Claster
    Bob Claster
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    Reply to  Rod S
    16 days ago

    If your dog is so small, it’s guaranteed that you’ll encounter larger dogs at the park. However, we have dogs of all sizes happily interacting there all the time. There isn’t enough space at Hart park for two separate play areas. The only people who want 2 separate dog areas are people who haven’t seen how well the various sizes intermingle in reality. However, if you feel that strongly about it, do feel free to go to a larger park where such feelings are indulged.

    angry gay pope
    angry gay pope
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    18 days ago

    Save Water + No Astroturf = Confusion

    John Ryan
    John Ryan
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    18 days ago

    GOOD! No nasty astroturf in Hart Park!! And PLEASE don’t reconfigure it into two parks….it aint broke, so don’t fix it.

    Mick in Weho
    Mick in Weho
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    Reply to  John Ryan
    18 days ago

    The dust flying around from the wood chips isn’t healthy either. It needs to go. Another solution is needed.

    Bob Claster
    Bob Claster
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    Reply to  Mick in Weho
    17 days ago

    Do you ever actually come to the dog park? Because we go there at least 4 or 5 times a week, and have never seen “dust flying around.” Sure, there’s a little dust, but nothing flying around, and certainly it’s not a carcinogenic and lethal situation akin to what there’d be from the PFAS and forever chemicals in the plastic of artificial grass, which can also leach into the ground water, suffocate the surrounding trees, and raise the neighborhood temperature. You’ve got dogs running around playing hard. So they kick up a little dust. No big deal, and no harm… Read more »

    Last edited 17 days ago by Bob Claster
    Luka
    Luka
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    18 days ago

    It’s better to do something natural – it can still be drought tolerant, and prettier (cooler, too)

    West
    West
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    18 days ago

    Finally some good news in the toxic chemical war zone that is industrial life. Even the turfs that market as PFAS-free still expose humans and animals to microplastics, and performance isn’t ideal. Grass is worth the maintenance investment, just skip the glyphosate!

    Hopefully Byers will seize the opportunity to exercise her principles here and lead the charge.

    Last edited 18 days ago by West
    Noah King
    Noah King
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    Reply to  West
    16 days ago

    How about pulling all the grass in the city of Los Angeles that is at least on public properties? And while they’re at it why not do brush clearage throughout Los Angeles especially in the mountains, the freeways, visibility on the overpass roads like Laurel canyon Topanga canyon sepulveda etc. Pine tree suck up more water than I think any tree on the planet!

    Replace it with drought tolerant vegetation and native vegetation that does not require massive amounts of upkeep and water!

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